Que C'est Bon!

Foodism

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Goodbye Tumblr, hello Blog Spot/Word Press

tumblr is awesome, a great place to share images and some text based things, but, being more of a writer and knowing that Tumblr has a more image based audience, I am going to say good bye.

Its been fun and I will continue using Tumblr to search for inspiring images for future design projects but I won’t be posting anymore (I have not in a long time, the drive dried out). I need to write and share.

I will continue blogging but on Blogger and Wordpress instead, text based spaces that will allow my pen to flow. If you are interested in checking out my blogs, they are: thedreammenagerie.blogger.com and thedreammenagerie.wordpress.com. A space to anonymously share  imagination and stories.

I’d like to give a shoutout to Cool Colors, I’ve loved your blog since I first started Tumblr as the decaffeinatedconchord about 2 or 3 years ago, as well as Paint Doktah Who, vintagegal, comiques, hitrecord, neil-gaimen.


Filed under paint doctah who vintagegal hitrecord neil-gaiman coolcolors

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Homemade Beer Batter Pizza

Recipe:

This recipe is simple and easy to make! The beer acts as the perfect yeast and gives the dough a nice thick and sticky feel but without that heavy feel that comes from most store bought and fast food pizza. Enjoy!

Dough:
- 3 cups of flour
- 1/3 a cup of oil
- 375 ml bottle of red or dark beer

Sauce:
- 1 can of tomato sauce
- Crushed chili peppers
- Oregano
- Basil
- Black pepper
- Garlic powder
- Cayenne powder
- Cumin

Toppings:
-Thinly sliced mozzarella cheese*You may add any toppings of your choice! Olives, basil leafs, onions, sun dried tomatoes, pepperoni, thin bell pepper slices, goat cheese, merguez… The possibilities are endless!


Directions for Dough:

Preheat oven to 350F. Put the flour in a large bowl and create a crater in the center. Pour the oil and beer into the crater. Using two fingers bring the liquids and solids together, then work with your hands, kneading the dough. Add flour when the dough get too sticky. Do not knead the dough too much or it will become too hard.
Once the dough is made, you may either divide it in 2 to make 2 thin crust pizzas or leave it as is to make a thicker crust pizza. Roll out dough into desired thickness and size, making sure the surface you are working on is well floured or the dough will stick! 
Once the pizza dough is rolled out to desired size, fold over the edges (about 1 centimeter or as much as you wish) of the dough to create a crust which will work to keep the sauce and toppings in place. Using a fork, poke holes into the dough in order to ensure a more even baking.

Directions for Sauce: 
Simply bring the tomato sauce to a simmer in a pot and add the spices and herbs to your liking, hence the lack of measurements given (a good chef tastes as he creates!). *I’m a fan of spice and heat and so is the handsome young chef who gave me the recipe, hence all the hot flavors!

Once the sauce and dough are done, add the sauce to the dough and adorn your pizza with your chosen toppings. Cooking time varies between 20-30 mins for the thin crust and 30-40 mins for the thicker crust, so be sure to check on your pizza more than once to ensure perfect baking!

Serve and Enjoy!
Recipe by the handsome chef David. Images taken by me and David!

Filed under pizza thin crust thick crust beer beer batter beer batter pizza

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La Buche - The Log CakePatisserie et Boulangerie Dolce PuiChristmas is approaching close, here in Montreal, Quebec, and the patisserie has received a lot of specialty orders: buche de noel, or better known to those outside of Quebec, the Christmas log. 
This cake is a Christmas special and comes in a variety of flavors, though some of the more traditional buches being with chocolate or coffee and topped with meringue logs and plastic evergreen trees. 
New flavors, outside of the cake base sphere, have also emerged and include buches made of various mousses (the exotique fruit mousse with a chocolate mousse topping being my favorite).
Weather you are sticking to tradition or willing to try a mousse based log cake, be sure to find a patisserie that prepares their buches no more than 3 weeks in advance for the best and freshest flavor.However, do not expect to find anything made the day of or even the cake of your choice a week before- these cakes, when done correctly, take a minimum of two days to prepare!

La Buche - The Log Cake
Patisserie et Boulangerie Dolce Pui

Christmas is approaching close, here in Montreal, Quebec, and the patisserie has received a lot of specialty orders: buche de noel, or better known to those outside of Quebec, the Christmas log.

This cake is a Christmas special and comes in a variety of flavors, though some of the more traditional buches being with chocolate or coffee and topped with meringue logs and plastic evergreen trees. 

New flavors, outside of the cake base sphere, have also emerged and include buches made of various mousses (the exotique fruit mousse with a chocolate mousse topping being my favorite).

Weather you are sticking to tradition or willing to try a mousse based log cake, be sure to find a patisserie that prepares their buches no more than 3 weeks in advance for the best and freshest flavor.However, do not expect to find anything made the day of or even the cake of your choice a week before- these cakes, when done correctly, take a minimum of two days to prepare!

Filed under patisserie buche de noel christmas logs

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Latte dans un Bol - Latte in a Bowl
While enjoying some chocolate fondue, I ordered a large cappuccino and received, to my bemusement, a cappuccino in a bowl. Lathered with creamy foam and a tasty bitter core, there was only one way to eat it: like soup! 
Ever since, the cappuccino in a bowl has continued to bewilder me- where does it come from? Europe? Or is it a North American invention?I’ve since found myself trying to perfect its taste, spending many afternoons  experimenting with the coffee machine. Anyone know of its origin and ho to properly prepare it?

Latte dans un Bol - Latte in a Bowl

While enjoying some chocolate fondue, I ordered a large cappuccino and received, to my bemusement, a cappuccino in a bowl. Lathered with creamy foam and a tasty bitter core, there was only one way to eat it: like soup! 

Ever since, the cappuccino in a bowl has continued to bewilder me- where does it come from? Europe? Or is it a North American invention?

I’ve since found myself trying to perfect its taste, spending many afternoons  experimenting with the coffee machine. Anyone know of its origin and ho to properly prepare it?

Filed under Cappuccino cappuccino in a bowl answer food espresso